Quaxtrip Update

April 11th, 2021 •

I’ve made the first major(ish) addition to Quaxtrip since launch. Rather than use a hardware mixer to get my synth setup into the computer, I tend to go directly into my multi-channel audio interface and do the mixing in software. Since Quaxtrip’s release I’ve developed an evolving set of patches to manage my personal integration with Quaxtrip. Figuring that there are likely others who work the same way, I decided to build this functionality into Quaxtrip. When you launch the mixer, you can combine up to eight stereo or mono channels to send to your remote peers as a mono or stereo mix.

There are a few other changes to the patch as well. Two separate mutes — local and remote — were added to the Local Input. This allows you to isolate the remote signals for local monitoring or prevent your signal from being sent to the remote partner(s), respectively. There also were changes to the send and receive objects you can use to hook into Quaxtrip in your own patches. This is a breaking change, so sorry about that, but the old strategy was too confusing.

There was also a minor bug fix or two, so I do recommend all users download this version.

I am planing more features in the coming weeks or months. Here’s some of the stuff I’m thinking about adding:

  • Synced recording of the local input of each performer.
  • Remote clock signal sharing (although it recently dawned on me (duh) that if you have a device with tap tempo, you can pretty much accomplish this manually without fancy clock sharing, but I never met a problem I couldn’t over-engineer…).
  • More robust text chat.

If you think of anything else you’d like to see added to Quaxtrip, don’t be shy. I’d like Quaxtrip to be useful for Max experts and novices alike, so I’ll do as much as I can to make it useful for a wide variety of users.

Find installation instructions and join the conversation over at the lines forum.

Announcing Quaxtrip – low latency audio over the internet in Max

December 1st, 2020 •

Quaxtrip is a set of Max patches that makes low-latency uncompressed audio and messaging interconnections over the internet, intended for musicians wishing to play together remotely.

Quaxtrip runs Miller Puckette’s Quacktrip Pure Data patch within Cycling ‘74’s Max. Quacktrip, in turn, is an implementation, in Pure Data, of Chris Chafe’s JackTrip network protocol, based on jacktrip.pd by Roman Haefeli and Johannes Schuett. It establishes a low-latency, point-to-point connection between two sites, with no audio compression. Quaxtrip allows up to four of these connections, allowing an ensemble of up to five players at once.

Learn more and join the discussion on the Lines forum or download the patch at GitHub.

Announcing Exquisite Coast

May 22nd, 2020 •

Exquisite Coast is a shared patch game for the Make Noise 0-Coast created by Damon Holzborn and John O’Brien. Exquisite Corpse is a collaborative image or text game, developed by the Surrealists, where a text or drawing is created either by some set rule or by only revealing the end of what the previous person contributed. In that spirit, Exquisite Coast uses a tight set of technical constraints as an artistic challenge that encourage a deep exploration of the instrument. These guidelines are designed to foster creativity, provide a useful method to get to know your 0-Coast, and engage with a wider community of music makers

Learn more and join in at ec.rustle.works.

Sharing Music with the Disquiet Junto

March 18th, 2020 •

Musicians looking for a little connection in this time of isolation might consider the Disquiet Junto. Each Thursday Marc Weidenbaum posts a compositional prompt to stoke creativity and over the next few days members of the junto complete the assignment and share their recordings. Track sharing and discussion takes place at the lines community (the forum set up by the Monome folks). You can browse past projects here. Sign up for the project announcement list to get the weekly prompts straight to your inbox. More about the Junto.

Everything is Better in Slo Mo No. 3

March 10th, 2020 •

Music and video by Damon Holzborn.

Carousel Bells

February 27th, 2020 •

Music by Damon Holzborn.
Video by Betsy Nagler.

Learning Crow, Script 4 – Krowll

December 3rd, 2019 •

[This is the fourth in a series of scripts I’m sharing while I learn to write applications for the new Monome Crow, a Eurorack module that connects to Norns or computers running Max, Max for Live, and other serial-enabled applications. Crow also stores a complete script, so that without a USB connection it can continue to run, responding to CV input and ii messages.]

This script is my take on the Krell patch. If you are unfamiliar with this idea, learn more at Learning Modular. My Crow version of this idea outputs envelope and pitch plus two other user selectable CV values.

Download the script and find more details at the Lines forum.

See my previous post to hear it in action.

Learning Crow, Script 3 – Voltage Utilities

December 2nd, 2019 •

[This is the third in a series of scripts I’m sharing while I learn to write applications for the new Monome Crow, a Eurorack module that connects to Norns or computers running Max, Max for Live, and other serial-enabled applications. Crow also stores a complete script, so that without a USB connection it can continue to run, responding to CV input and ii messages.]

I’m always finding myself befuddled about the CV range a given input of a Eurorack module wants to see. The main function of this script is to take CV into input 1 OR input 2 and scale it out the outputs.

  • If it sees voltage at input 1, it sends a separately scaled voltage out each output
  • If it sees voltage in input 2, it sends the same scaled voltage out of every output

You can also send it a message in order to just send an arbitrary fixed voltage out each of the outputs, or a different fixed voltage out of each.

Download the script and find more details at the Lines forum.

Time Vampires

June 15th, 2019 •

Lest we think that we weren’t warned about the perils of social media until too late, here’s Douglas Coupland (or, one his characters in Microserfs anyway) in 1993:

“The modern economy isn’t about the redistribution of wealth—it’s about the redistribution of time. Instead of battling to control rubber boot factories, the modern post-Maoist wants to battle for your 45 minutes of daily discretionary time. The consumer electronics industry is all about lassoing your time, not your money—that time-greedy ego-part of the brain that wants to maximize a year’s worth of year.”

Minute Morph No. 1

June 14th, 2019 •

A beta exploration of the upcoming Park pseudo live coding system.